What Do People Want Most of All?

In my humble opinion, people want freedom, freedom to speak without fear of retribution, freedom to defend their own, freedom to believe openly, freedom to provide for their own and freedom to independence.

  1. I ask you the reader, the fellow blogger and the rest of the participants, what do you want and what do you think of what others want?

 

  1. How would you facilitate this for yourself, how would you deal with others being free, if their freedom collides with yours?

 

  1. Whom do we desire freedom for and what?

 

  1. Is my freedom more important than yours?

 

  1. Are we supposed to work in unison for the freedoms of others, if so, who will work for our freedoms?

 

  1. Is freedom individual and an individual responsibility, or is it the responsibility of others to dictate our freedoms?

 

If you do not believe that people want freedom, then what in your opinion is it that people want?

 

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21 thoughts on “What Do People Want Most of All?

  1. Anonymous

    1. You’re right. Freedom!

    2. There has to be a middle ground. There is always a middle ground of compromise where we all can be free.

    3. For ourselves, for our loved ones, for the rest of society.

    4. You know the answer to that is a resounding no.

    5. The “others” that we work for their freedom will in turn work for ours.

    6. My ancestors fought too long and too hard for others to dictate my freedom.

    1. bottomlesscoffee007

      I concur with your answers, except for your answer on number 5. The reason in my mind is simple, there is no way of knowing that anyone else will fight for my freedoms, your freedoms or anyone else’s on that matter. There may be some that are willing to fight for the rights of others, but their motives and their definition of freedom may be different from mine or ours. For this one reason, I would not trust them. Often times “freedom fighters” will say that they fight for the freedoms of all, when in fact, they use this to their and solely their advantage.

      Thanks for reading and responding. If you have something else to say, please, feel free to say whatever you want.

  2. 1.a. What I want is freedom and opportunity. 1.b. What I think some people want is a handout.
    2.a. Fight against those who are trying to infringe my freedom and opportunity. 2.b. I’m big about morals, and doing “the right thing”, so as long as both parties are operating with that in mind, the freedoms can co-exist. Otherwise… we have what we have today.
    3. I desire freedom for myself. Some people might not want the freedom that I have in mind, so I leave it up to them
    4. My freedom is not more important than yours, just because it’s mine. It depends what the type of freedom is.
    5. No, like I said before, we might want different kinds of freedom, so we should focus on our own. If we’re thinking into the future, and making the world a better place for our offspring, I still think OUR freedom should be our priority. Why? Because if we fight for future freedom, we miss out on the freedom here and now. And who knows how thing will be in the future? Things we value might not be valued then, etc.
    6. You might have gathered from the rest of my comment – our responsibility,

  3. bottomlesscoffee007

    Thats the thing Goldie, I believe we must allow freedom to others, to gain our freedom from them. We may define freedom differently and some may want a hand out, but the more we grant freedom to others, I think the more freedom we will gain, in the now. The freer we are today, the freer we will be tomorrow, and so on.

    I know and understand that there are plenty of people who want to not only limit our freedom, but to enslave us as well. Thats why we must continue to allow freedoms to everyone, the more that are free and get a taste of freedom, the more that will refuse to give it up.

    Thanks for reading and commenting Floatinggold, I appreciate the continued support and conversation.

  4. I ask you the reader, the fellow blogger and the rest of the participants, what do you want and what do you think of what others want? I want to be successful, knowledgeable, and free to do as I please without hindrance.

    How would you facilitate this for yourself, how would you deal with others being free, if their freedom collides with yours? Compromise my freedom if they compromise theirs. Destroy their freedom to secure mine if they are unwilling to compromise.

    Whom do we desire freedom for and what? We desire freedom for ourselves and for anyone who benefits freedoms.

    Is my freedom more important than yours? A persons freedom is always the most important to them. This doesn’t mean they want sacrifice it for someone else it just denotes the level of importance.

    Are we supposed to work in unison for the freedoms of others, if so, who will work for our freedoms? We must work for the freedoms of others if we expect freedom to reach critical mass. This is to say that we want more freedoms and free people and less restriction or restricted people. Restriction applied to one person could then be applied to you so the less restrictions and more freedoms the lower the risk to self freedom.

    Is freedom individual and an individual responsibility, or is it the responsibility of others to dictate our freedoms? Both. You are responsible for your freedom and at the same time need other working for your freedom when you are unavailable or unaware of a threat to that freedom.

    If you do not believe that people want freedom, then what in your opinion is it that people want? People want the freedom to want regardless of the target goal. If a person were to say that they didn’t want freedom then they are really saying they want the freedom to not have freedom.

    People want the freedom to want whatever they want. O.o

  5. 1. I want the freedom to exist without being strangled in a debt based slavery system. What others want is none of my business.

    2. I haven’t a clue.

    3. Myself. I can offer well wishes for others.

    4. Not from where I’m standing. Minding my own business & well wishes, again…

    5. That sounds a lot like unions bargaining for more money & benefits. Judging by what we have on our hands right now, it may come to all of us working in conjunction with each other out of pure necessity. Sometimes, there is strength in numbers. Sometimes, you wind up with mob rule.

    6. We are responsible. We’ve already abdicated too much as it is.

  6. As I see it, most people value security more than freedom. That’s one reason freedoms are always in jeopardy.

    I suspect those who want security more than freedom tend to want, above all else, happiness; while those who want freedom more than security, tend to value above all else meaning or purpose in life — or perhaps self-flourishing.

    But these are just suspicions. I wouldn’t really know.

    1. bottomlesscoffee007

      That’s an interesting dynamic you bring up, safety or freedom. I don’t believe that safety and freedom can coexist on the same plane. The scariest part of safety is that one must forfeit their own freedom in exchange for safety. On the other hand, freedom has the possibility of crushing others freedoms. Safety and freedom can only work in a society of law abiders, and of mutual respect. People everywhere, no matter where or when will never exist in harmony. Those who value freedom in my mind take on more personal responsibility and accountability, whereas those who value safety, expect others to sacrifice their freedoms for the safety of others.

      The individual is responsible in a free environment whereas when the society forfeits their freedoms in the name of safety, no one is truly free or safe.

      1. Couldn’t agree with you more on this one. One of the things that most alarmed me about our country’s mindset was that after 9/11 Bush and crew led us down the path of sacrificing freedoms for safety with the Patriot Act — which was nearly unanimously voted for by both sides of the aisle.

        We could have used a Roosevelt in the White House — either Teddy or Franklin. Or an Eisenhower, for that matter. All three of them believed in freedom more than the whole lot of ’em. One thing 9/11 showed was how disastrous it is to have poor leadership.

  7. Saumya Agrawal

    1. I want happiness and satisfaction in whatever I do. I think all people want is money. 😀
    2. I am someone who stays in my shell. I let people be. So I don’t think freedom’s would collide. But if they do, I’d try and make them understand my position and try to understand theirs too to come to a mutual conclusion.
    3. I desire freedom for myself. I find that sometimes I don’t allow myself to be me.
    4. Everyone’s freedom is equally important.
    5. If they are people who don’t realise that they are chain bound, or they can’t free themselves on their own, then we should work for their freedom. We can work on our freedom simultaneously. Who said you can’t work on freedom of many people including yours at the same time?
    5. I think my freedom is my responsibility. But then the societal factor does come in. Though it’s not anyone’s responsibility to dictate our freedoms, but sometimes we do let them do it because that’s how the society works.

    1. bottomlesscoffee007

      Interesting aspects, I appreciate you taking the time to read and comment. I find it introspective that the majority of the answers revolve around freedom. I think we all desire what we desire, yet compromise always seems to be the responsibility of the other side or our own side. I wonder what would happen if we all realized that we are already free, how would we treat each other if we realized that our freedoms could cause them catastrophe and their freedoms could cost us catastrophe. The ying and the yang, the balance is delicate.

      1. Saumya Agrawal

        That’s an interesting thought. The conflict of freedoms would surely arise in that case. And then, it would be better to rise above ourselves and step into the shoes of the other person to know what it is like to be in their place. This would help balance the yin and the yang.

        1. bottomlesscoffee007

          The biggest problem I can take away from this scenario is we are already too often called to compromise for another, unseen usually and it usually is pushed by politicians. Never us.

        2. bottomlesscoffee007

          At the same time, I would rather compromise myself, rather than be forced into compromise by law. I wonder how many out there are fine with the status quo of mass compromise, rather than individual? I see individual compromise as more or less, charity.

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